As Trump approaches his 100th day, here are the promises he’s kept and is likely to keep

It’s been a tumultuous first few months for our 45th president, and much of that has been by design – thanks to his political opponents who, by the way, are on both sides of the aisle in Congress.

That said, Democrats — with the help of the discredited establishment media — are President Donald J. Trump’s most vociferous political adversaries, with most of them doing all they can to rile up their far-Left Marxist base with endless protests as they practice endless obstruction to his initiatives, appointments and policies.

Nevertheless, the president has managed some big victories for all Americans along the way – including those #NeverTrump types who, no matter what he does for them, will never support him.

As his 100th day in office approaches, it’s time to reflect on Trump’s successes, his likely successes, and a few things he may have changed his mind about (H/T Lifezette).

— Cutting the bureaucracy: One of Trump’s earliest actions was to curb the power and scope of the federal bureaucracy, and he’s done this in a number of ways. From implementing a hiring freeze to signing an executive order requiring federal agencies to eliminate two rules for every new one issued, to “minimizing the economic burden of” Obamacare, Trump has delivered early on this campaign pledge. But he’s not finished; in the end, he has said he thinks he can safely eliminate 75 percent of existing regulations. (RELATED: Another promise kept as Trump takes chainsaw to federal regulations)

— Withdrawing from TPP: On Trump’s second full day in office, he signed an order withdrawing the United States from the loathsome Trans-Pacific Partnership, which was negotiated in secret, stored under guard and which was shown to U.S. lawmakers only on the condition they sign an agreement in which they promised not to disclose any of its details. In his first major foreign policy speech as the leading GOP presidential contender in May 2016, Trump pledged to kill the deal as he railed against “globalism” in general, believing – correctly – it would lead to the outsourcing of even more U.S. jobs.

— Refusal of salary: Trump pledged early in his campaign to refuse his presidential salary. “The first thing I’m going to do is tell you that if I’m elected president, I’m accepting no salary, okay?” he said at a Sept. 2015 rally, as reported by Lifezette. “That’s not a big deal for me.” Thus far, the president is keeping his word; the White House noted on April 3 that Trump donated his first quarter salary to the National Park Service.

— Put a conservative on SCOTUS: Following the sudden death of constitutional originalist Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, Trump – in a bid to ease worries among conservatives within the GOP – released a list of potential Supreme Court nominees containing the names of originalist judges and scholars. Though it took the Senate changing its rules thanks to obstructionist Democrats, one person from that list – Judge Neil M. Gorsuch – was eventually confirmed to fill Scalia’s seat, fulfilling a Trump campaign pledge.

— Make American energy great again: During the campaign, Trump said he would reverse former President Obama’s decisions to halt a pair of pipelines under construction designed to transport oil from Canadian fields to refineries in the United States. On the campaign trail, Trump harshly criticized those decisions and promised to restore the projects on the way to making the U.S. more energy independent – while also pledging to do so safely. Again, this was one of his first actions as president. (RELATED: Trump advances two energy infrastructure projects: Keystone XL and the Dakota Access pipelines… can he balance infrastructure with environmental protection, too?)

— Take on ISIS: More specifically, Trump promised to “bomb the s**t out of ISIS” on several occasions, and last week that’s precisely what he did. Commander-in-chief Trump became the first president under which the military used a MOAB – “Mother of all bombs” or, more correctly, a Massive Ordinance Air Blast weapon – to destroy an ISIS cave system in eastern Afghanistan. This munition is the largest non-nuclear bomb in the world, and could very easily have been a signal to Iran and North Korea.

Trump has also retreated from some positions, such as declaring China a currency manipulator – but he appears to have reversed course in an effort to win Beijing’s help in dealing with North Korea’s nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs, which Trump has identified as a principle threat to the U.S.

Promises he still believes he can deliver: Tax reform, Obamacare repeal and replace, and cutting funding to so-called “Sanctuary Cities” that provide a haven for illegal aliens.

J.D. Heyes is a senior writer for NaturalNews.com and NewsTarget.com, as well as editor of The National Sentinel.

Sources:

Lifezette.com

BigGovernment.news


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